Spring

Say it isn’t so. Officially Spring. Had a nice ride though.

SF Bay
SF Bay
SF Bay Trail
SF Bay Trail
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Cheviot

A cheviot is a a black faced Scottish sheep. It’s also my new bike from Rivendell. My daughter wanted a Sam Hillborne and I wanted a mixte, so we stripped my Hillborne, which my daughter built up to her liking. I then bought a Cheviot, the new luscious green and used my old components to build it up (though I did splurge on new Paul Racer brakes). Here’s some close-ups……..

nice water bottle cage
nice water bottle cage
beautiful lugs
beautiful lugs
headbadge
headbadge
fork crown
fork crown
"on your left"
“on your left”
centerpulls
centerpulls
only a Brooks
only a Brooks
cork grips, Shimano levers and Silver friction shifters
cork grips, Shimano levers and Silver friction shifters

Beausage

So far I’ve had an excellent Thanksgiving break. Four days off work, my daughter and I working on the loft, then a super duper Thanksgiving dinner with family (one pictured above in the header). Tonight’s my birthday celebration; dinner at one of my all time favorite restaurants, again with family. Oh yea, and a couple of bike rides in there somewhere.

My daughter continues to teach me a lot. Some of the values she actually lives and just doesn’t talk about are featured in the below video. Both my daughter’s ideas and the video contain the idea of beausage, a concept (lifestyle?) introduced by Grant Petersen.

Buy less and use it longer. And…….. ride more. My Thanksgiving resolution.

peace, ks

#1

Today is the beginning of the Coffeeneuring Challenge sponsored by Chasing Mailboxes DC.  I had a bit of a longer ride planned for the day, but it’s windy, warm and dry. Only 16% humidity;  the area is covered with fire warnings.  I hope everyone in the Bay Area and surroundings is careful. I got so hot I had to stop for a cold drink; an iced berry, pomegranite tea cooler. First time I’ve tried one of those. Tasty! I probably could accomplish all 7 rides required for the challenge by hitting 7 different Peet’s.

solanopeets

Went out on the Hillborne today. Actually I haven’t ridden any of my other bikes since I brought her home. And yesterday I listed my Salsa Vaya for sale to finance the changes for the Dummy. If anyone’s interested in the Vaya, email me: kls01@me.com       I was siting enjoying my iced beverage when I saw a fellow cyclist pull up and lock up his bike. Funny because I noticed the moustache bars on his bike; they’re not that common. He came up to me inquiring if the Hillborne was mine. He hadn’t been able to find bar end shifters for his bars. That’s easy, contact Rivendell.

peace, ks

Super Supple, Buttery Smooth

I posed a question on a randonneur forum whether it was worth it to switch from 38mm tires to 32’s. You can imagine the range of responses I might get. It’s just not a simple question. Besides the obvious difference of decreased tire contact the smaller you go, there’s weight, tread, and casing differences. I actually had a tire in mind; the Grand Bois Cypress.

Grand Bois Cypress
Grand Bois Cypress

My Sam Hillborne came with Continental TourRides; heavy and stiff, at 38mm (this is what is measures, I think the labeling lists the tire at 42). Everyone agreed, Grand Bois tires are quite magnificent, though some believe a little more flat prone than others. Some recommended staying with a 38mm for comfort, and a common tire of choice was the Pari-Moto. This tire also has a nice recommendation on Rivendell’s website. However, coming from 23cm on my Lemond (which I sold in Jan.), I felt like 32mm would still provide me with plenty of comfort. But, what turned the tide in favor of the Grand Bois was the description by fellow randonneur who said, “Going from heavy, 650 gram, super-thick, tough Conti TourRides to not-quite-paper-thin, super-supple, buttery-smooth 290 gram Grand Bois Cyprès tires will, indeed, give you a very different ride.” Yep, that’s what I’m hoping for. I ordered them yesterday from Compass Bicycles.

The Conti’s are great for commuting and mixed terrain. I have full confidence in them rolling over street debris and don’t think twice about riding off-road, like a fire trail. But, for lots of road riding, increased time in the saddle, and some events I want to participate in this summer, I just wanted the super supple, buttery-smooth ride.

Meet Sam

I should have had this post completed before I posted the last one, but I wanted to take the time to get some good pictures and I tell you about the wonderful ride I had the first time out with my Sam Hillborne. Now she’s been in my possession for a week and-a-half. I commuted 2 days to work last week (one very foul morning with misty fog blowing horizontal) and took a ride yesterday where I stopped and finally took some pix.

sam-H

Lucky for me Rivendell is close to where I live so I was able to ride different sizes before I ordered. Some have complained about the “boring” blue (compared to the previous orange and green) frame color, but with the cream accents of the frame, which also highlight the nice lug work, IMHO, it’s quite lovely. If you’re not aware of how Rivendell works I’ll give you the low down. You first buy a frame (steel CroMo) which includes the fork, headset and BB; not cheap but not as expensive as others for a really nice lugged frame with superb paint quality. Definitely less expensive than custom. You can build your frame up yourself, take it to the LBS, or customize all you want and have Rivendell build it for you. Another choice is to have Rivendell build your bike with one of their recommended build kits. I went with a build kit.

  • Nitto moustache bar
  • Nitto stem (1″ threaded quill)
  • bar-end shifters
  • Shimano brake levers
  • Sugino triple crank
  • Shimano XT dérailleurs
  • Tektro side-pull brakes
  • Deore hubs on Velocity rims (36 hole) 650b
  • Continental Tour Ride Tires

I also had them add the fenders, which by the way, match the cream color on the  frame. For whatever reason, the build kit does not include a saddle or pedals. When I got home I added a WTB Deva saddle and Crank Brothers pedals.

shiftersbrakeleversI’m sure you noticed the Carradice bag; a first for me. I must be getting more traditional as I get older. It’s a Barley bag; one of the originals. I obsessed about how to attach it to the saddle. Most modern saddles do not have bag loops. The choices were, adding bag loops, a clamp attached to the saddle rails, the Bagman rack, and the SQR uplift rack. All options are Carradice accessories. I went with the SQR for theses reasons: for both the bag loops and clamp I worried the bag would rest on the fenders. Also they changed the Bagman rack; it’s new evolution has additional struts that attach to the rack mounts of the frame. Though I have no intention of adding a rear rack, I really did not like the looks of the new Bagman. The SQR rack attaches to the seat post and has a quick release mechanism making it easy to take your bag with you if you leave your bike locked somewhere. The quick release was appealing. Most importantly though, was that the rack lifted the bag up and away from both the seat and the fender. In addition, if I ever wanted to get a bigger saddlebag, any model (Carradice) would fit on the uplift rack.

barleySo, that’s my Sam in a nutshell. Tomorrow’s another long ride on the San Francisco Bay Trail which looks a lot like this.

marinabay